Review 19 Search Page
 



 
New Reviews

Katherine Judith Anderson
TWISTED WORDS: TORTURE AND LIBERALISM IN IMPERIAL BRITAIN
(Ohio State, 2022) xi + 214 pp.
Reviewed by Miriam Burstein on 2022-07-30
Victorian Culture
For some time now, scholars working across disciplines ranging from political science to literary theory have been investigating how liberalism is sustained by forms of violence that it frequently tends to disavow.
Click here to read the full review.

Eric G. Wilson
DREAM-CHILD: A LIFE OF CHARLES LAMB
(Yale, 2022) 521 pp.
Reviewed by Adam Neikirk on 2022-07-21
Victorian Poetry
"I had a vague sense of worldly trouble, and of great and serious change in my condition; besides which, I had to quit my old cloisters, and my playmates, and long habits of all sorts .
Click here to read the full review.

Rebecca Richardson
MATERIAL AMBITIONS: SELF-HELP AND VICTORIAN LITERATURE
(Johns Hopkins, 2021) x + 255 pp.
Reviewed by Kyoko Takanashi on 2022-07-09
Victorian Literature
Despite its immediate, enduring, and wide-spread popularity in the Victorian period, Samuel Smiles's Self-Help (1859) has not received much critical attention.
Click here to read the full review.

Jessica Fay
THE COLLECTED LETTERS OF SIR GEORGE AND LADY BEAUMONT TO THE WORDSWORTH FAMILY, 1803-1829, with a Study of the Creative Exchange between Wordsworth and Beaumont
(Liverpool, 2021) xxviii + 334 pp.
Reviewed by Richard Matlak on 2022-06-06
Romantic Poetry
In arguing for the dialogic relationship that inspired Wordsworth and Coleridge, Paul Magnuson says that "reading only Coleridge's poetry or only Wordsworth's is somewhat like listening to half of a telephone conversation" (Coleridge and Wordsworth: A Lyrical Dialogue, 18).
Click here to read the full review.

Kendall McClellan
VIRTUOUS CITIZENS: COUNTERPUBLICS AND SOCIOPOLITICAL AGENCY IN TRANSATLANTIC LITERATURE
(U of Alabama P, 2021) 182 pp.
Reviewed by Ashley Reed on 2022-05-24
Literature and Culture
This book joins recent critical attempts to expand definitions of citizenship beyond those bounded solely by the franchise and to show how politically marginalized people increasingly entered into a late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century public sphere that was dominated by upper-class men's values and voices.
Click here to read the full review.

Dara Rossman Regaignon
WRITING MATERNITY: MEDICINE, ANXIETY, RHETORIC, AND GENRE
(Ohio State, 2021) xvi + 186 pp.
Reviewed by Livia Arndal Woods on 2022-04-22
Victorian Culture
Today, I rushed from one grocery store where the organic whole milk was sold out to another grocery store rather than buying organic 2% milk or non-organic whole milk.
Click here to read the full review.