Review 19: An Online Review of New Books on English and American Literature of the 19th Century
 

New Reviews
 
David O'Shaughnessy, ed.
IRELAND, ENLIGHTENMENT, AND THE ENGLISH STAGE, 1740-1820
(Cambridge, 2019), xvi+268pp.
Reviewed by Emily Hodgson Anderson on 2019-11-05.

The British Enlightenment owed a large debt to Ireland. More specifically, as David O'Shaughnessy's impeccably edited collection of essays illustrates, it owed a large debt to the Irish stage. By the "Irish stage" I mean a range of things. I mean the Irish actors and actresses who plied their trade on the main stages of London, enacting there a range of ethnic characters and bringing to English...
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Catherine J. Golden
SERIALS TO GRAPHIC NOVELS: THE EVOLUTION OF THE VICTORIAN ILLUSTRATED BOOK
(Florida, 2017) xviii + 299 pp.
Reviewed by Philip V. Allingham on 2019-10-18.

In this book Catherine J. Golden, author of Posting It: The Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing (2010) and Images of the Woman Reader in Victorian British and American Fiction (2003), and editor of Book Illustrated: Text, Image, and Culture, 1770-1930 (2000), charts the principal developments in illustrated fiction from the earliest of the illustrated serials of the...
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Pamela K. Gilbert
VICTORIAN SKIN: SURFACE, SELF, HISTORY
(Cornell 2019) xi + 434 pp.
Reviewed by Tabitha Sparks on 2019-10-11.

In The Lampshade (2010), journalist Mark Jacobson traces the origin of the titular object, which was purportedly made from the flayed skin of a Jewish victim of the Nazis. When he consults a spiritualist, she intuits the human source of the lampshade and confirms the Holocaust origin story. This utterly changes Jacobson's relationship to the lampshade, which he now sees as a relic of unimaginable...
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Adena Spingarn
UNCLE TOM FROM MARTYR TO TRAITOR
(Stanford, 2018) xii + 252 pp.
Reviewed by Debra J. Rosenthal on 2019-10-08.

We all know that Uncle Tom died a martyr. No -- wait -- he died a traitor to his race. Was Tom a strong, admirable father who sacrificed himself in a Christ-like fashion to prevent his wife and children from being sold, or was he a shuffling, subservient sell-out of black Americans whose "yes massa" talk reinforced ideas of black inferiority? This bifurcated view of Harriet Beecher Stowe's most...
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Kathleen Anderson
JANE AUSTEN'S WOMEN: AN INTRODUCTION
(SUNY, 2018) xxv + 293 pp.
Reviewed by June Sturrock on 2019-10-07.

Kathleen Anderson founds the arguments of this book on a detailed knowledge of Austen's six novels acquired over years of reading, teaching, and thinking about them. A brief introduction leads to eight chapters organized into three parts: "Women and the Body: Strength, Sex, and Austenian Wellness"; "Women's Natures: Mood, Mind, Spirit, and Female Giftedness" and "Women and Others: The Female Self...
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