Review 19: An Online Review of New Books on English and American Literature of the 19th Century
 

New Reviews
 
Jill Galvan and Elsie Michie, eds.
REPLOTTING MARRIAGE IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
(Ohio State, 2018) v + 269 pp.
Reviewed by Colleen M. Kropp on 2019-10-07.

Marriage in the nineteenth-century is critically central, symbolically and structurally, to the way the British novel emerges as a genre. How do you even begin replotting a deeply cultural, social event like marriage? Jill Galvan and Elsie Michie offer a provocative compilation of essays that explores what it means to rethink the British "marriage plot," which they describe as "the phrase [that]...
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Thomas H. Ford
WORDSWORTH AND THE POETICS OF AIR
(Cambridge, 2018) x + 269 pp.
Reviewed by Scott Hess on 2019-09-17.

The scope of Ford's book is much broader than its title suggests. While William Wordsworth's poetry does feature intermittently as a recurring touchstone, the book ranges widely over many Romantic discourses and disciplines, both British and German, to demonstrate the significance of atmosphere as a major trope of the Romantic period. Ford documents how this widely diffused interest in atmosphere...
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Christopher Taylor
EMPIRE OF NEGLECT: THE WEST INDIES IN THE WAKE OF BRITISH LIBERALISM
(Duke, 2018) xi+307 pp.
Reviewed by Martha Schoolman on 2019-08-27.

This is a brilliantly conceived and beautifully executed study of British West Indian writing between approximately 1776 (the year that The Wealth of Nations was published among other world-historical occurrences) and 1860. The study's key archival "attunement," to use one of the author's favored terms, is to the various ways that West Indian Anglophone writers rejected the liberal market...
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Ian Haywood, Susan Matthews, and Mary L. Shannon, eds.
ROMANTICISM AND ILLUSTRATION
(Cambridge, 2019) xv + 325 pp.
Reviewed by Grant Scott on 2019-08-23.

By rights, the present collection of essays should be dedicated to Thomas Stothard, the patron saint of book illustration, and feature his portrait as its frontispiece. After all, his name appears on practically every page. Though little known today, Stothard was the most prolific and versatile illustrator of his time, executing over 5,000 designs and playing a part in many of the most important...
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Linda Freedman
WILLIAM BLAKE AND THE MYTH OF AMERICA: FROM THE ABOLITIONISTS TO THE COUNTERCULTURE
(Oxford, 2019) xiv + 273 pp.
Reviewed by Andrew Lincoln on 2019-08-15.

Linda Freedman's wide-ranging and consistently illuminating book is an important contribution to the burgeoning field of Blake reception studies. Ranging from early American re-printings of Blake poems in the 1830s and 1840s to the political activism of Paul Chan in the twenty-first century, Freedman examines religious writers, countercultural poets, musicians, novelists, and film-makers. To encompass...
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