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New Reviews

Daniel Westover and Thomas Alan Holmes, eds.
THE FIRE THAT BREAKS: GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS’S POETIC LEGACIES
(Clemson, 2020) viii + 344 pp.
Reviewed by A. J. Nickerson on 2020-06-15
Victorian Poetry
"Echos," Hopkins complained, "are a disease of education, literature is full of them; but they remain a disease, an evil" (6 February 1885).
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Joachim Frenk and Lena Steveker, eds.
CHARLES DICKENS AS AN AGENT OF CHANGE
(Cornell, 2019) xx + 242 pp.
Reviewed by Robert L. Patten on 2020-06-13
Victorian Novel
The project of Dickens as an agent of change was initiated in an International Seminar at the bilingual Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany in 2010.
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Mark Knight
Good Words: Evangelicalism and the Victorian Novel
(Ohio State UP, 2019) ix + 187 pp.
Reviewed by Winter Jade Werner on 2020-06-13
Victorian Novel
Despite renewed interest in the ties between religion and Victorian literature, some critics still assume that evangelicalism opposed the realist novel.
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Matthew Bevis
WORDSWORTH'S FUN
(Chicago, 2019), 303 pp.
Reviewed by Leslie Brisman on 2020-06-04
Romantic Poetry
Harold Bloom was fond of saying that the genius of a book could be measured by the number of times per page that it made one's jaw drop in amazement.
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Jerome McGann, ed.
Martin Delany's BLAKE; OR THE HUTS OF AMERICA. A CORRECTED EDITION
(Harvard, 2017) xxxviii + 344 pp.
Reviewed by Evan Loker on 2020-05-20
American
Since its recovery by Floyd Miller in 1970, Martin Delany's serialized novel Blake; or the Huts of America has been at the forefront of successive trends in politically-minded Americanist Studies.
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Elizabeth Freeman
BESIDE YOU IN TIME: SENSE METHODS AND QUEER SOCIABILITIES IN THE AMERICAN 19TH CENTURY
(Duke, 2019), xii + 228 pp.
Reviewed by Daniel T. O'Hara on 2020-04-08
American
The jacket copy for Beside You in Time explains that its author expands biopolitical and queer theory by outlining a temporal view of the long nineteenth century.
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